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12 Top-Rated Campgrounds at Grand Teton National Park, WY

Written by Brad Lane
Jun 8, 2020

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Set in the adventure-rich state of Wyoming, Grand Teton National Park sits high on the horizon and attracts visitors from around the world. Spread throughout the different vantage points of this iconic alpine landscape, scenic campgrounds can be found waiting for you to spend the night.

Split between concessionaire campgrounds within park boundaries, US Forest Service campgrounds in the surrounding national forests, and backcountry camping zones for backpacking, the campgrounds near Grand Teton National Park provide easy access to the impressive peaks.

Whether you pitch a tent in the Jenny Lake campground, or plug into a spot at the Gros Ventre Campground, all campgrounds near Grand Teton National Park are in bear country, and campers need to take proper precautions.

Pick the best place to stay with our list of the top campgrounds in Grand Teton National Park.

See also: Where to Stay near Grand Teton National Park

Note: Some businesses may be temporarily closed due to recent global health and safety issues.

1. Jenny Lake Campground

Jenny Lake with a mountain backdrop
Jenny Lake with a mountain backdrop | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Found at the heart of Grand Teton National Park, the Jenny Lake Campground ranks high as one of the best campgrounds in Wyoming. It features some of the most popular campsites within the park.

The campground is operated by the Grand Teton Lodge Company, and it's not just the supreme scenery of the adjacent Jenny Lake and Teton Range horizon that makes it so popular, it's the central location that draws a crowd.

All 59 sites at the Jenny Lake Campground, including the ten hiker/biker-only campsites, each share access to nearby flushing toilets and potable water.

Available on a first-come, first-served basis, Jenny Lake Campground typically fills up before 9am. Grab your spot early, though, and reserve it for up to 14 days at a time, and one of the best seats in the house for admiring the Teton Range can be yours to spend the night.

The Jenny Lake Campground only facilitates tent camping. The nearby Jenny Lake Store offers goods like firewood, snacks, and ice. The rest of the park is easily accessible from the Jenny Lake Campground, including the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center only eight miles away.

Address: Teton Park Road, Jenny Lake Campground, Moose, Wyoming

Official site: http://www.gtlc.com/camping/jenny-lake-campground

2. Gros Ventre Campground

Gros Ventre Campground
Gros Ventre Campground | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

With more than 300 campsites nestled into the cottonwood trees alongside the Gros Ventre River, The Gros Ventre Campground is one of the largest overnight spaces available near the Tetons. The real appeal of the this campground is its scenic surroundings and immediate access to the attractions shooting into the sky within Grand Teton National Park.

Located on the southern tip of the national park, near the Moose Entrance, the Gros Ventre Campground is operated by the Grand Teton Lodge Company on a first-come, first-served basis. All 300 sites can accommodate RVs, although one loop is dedicated to tent-campers only, and 36 sites have electrical hookup.

Campsites fill up quickly throughout the summer season at Gros Ventre, making an early arrival a recommended course of action. Every campsite at the Gros Ventre Campground includes a picnic table, fire pit, and parking spot, as well as close-by flushing toilets and potable water.

Address: 100 Gros Ventre Campground Road, Kelly, Wyoming

Official site: http://www.gtlc.com/camping/gros-ventre-campground

3. Colter Bay Campground

Colter Bay Campground
Colter Bay Campground | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Colter Bay Campground is on the shores of Jackson Lake in the northern region of Grand Teton National Park. The campground offers more than 300 campsites through the Grand Teton Lodge Company concessionaire. Split between tent sites and RV-designated parking spots, most of the campsites at Colter Bay are non-electric, and all provide access to potable water and modern bathroom facilities.

With proximity to the Colter Bay Village and Colter Bay Marina, campers at Colter Bay Campground are only a short walk from showers, laundry service, and a general store. The village also provides numerous outlets for adventure, including boat rentals, chuck wagon rides, and guided fishing tours.

Address: 100 Colter Bay Campground Road, Colter Bay Campground, Moran, Wyoming

Official site: http://www.gtlc.com/camping/colter-bay-campground

4. Signal Mountain Campground

Signal Mountain Campground
Signal Mountain Campground | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Operated by the Forever Resorts concessionaire within Grand Teton National Park, Signal Mountain Campground is located near the south shore of Jackson Lake.

The campground features 81 sites that can accommodate RVs up to 30 feet in length. Most sites at Signal Mountain are non-electric, and all campsites operate exclusively on a first-come, first-served basis, with capacity often reached in the summer season by 10am.

Signal Mountain Campground comes equipped with flushing toilets and cold running water, and each campsite includes a picnic table, fire ring, and a place to park your car.

Thanks to the nearby Signal Mountain Lodge, overnight users and visitors have access to a general store, public showers, and a laundromat. The lodge also features several dining options, including the Trapper Grill Breakfast and Leek's Pizzeria.

Official site: http://www.signalmountainlodge.com/lodge-services/signal-mountain-camping

5. Lizard Creek Campground

North end of Jackson Lake near Lizard Creek Campground
North end of Jackson Lake near Lizard Creek Campground

Located on the north end of Jackson Lake and Grand Teton National Park, the Lizard Creek Campground offers quiet surroundings alongside stunning scenery.

Operated by the Forever Resorts concessionaire, the 60 non-electric sites comprising the Lizard Creek Campground can be found nestled into an aromatic swath of spruce and fir. Campsites at Lizard Creek can accommodate vehicles up to 30 feet in length.

One of the biggest draws of the Lizard Creek Campground is the adjacent Jackson Lake, which provides opportunities to swim, fish, and admire the Teton Range backdrop on full display.

Located just as close to some of the top attractions of Yellowstone National Park, the Lizard Creek Campground is perfect for those looking to transition from one park to the other. Much like the other campground operated by Forever Resorts, Signal Mountain Campground, campsites at Lizard Creek are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Address: Lizard Creek Rd, Moran, Wyoming

Official site: http://www.signalmountainlodge.com/lodge-services/signal-mountain-camping

6. Curtis Canyon Campground

The Tetons are on full display from the Curtis Canyon Campground.
The Tetons are on full display from the Curtis Canyon Campground. | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Located less than 10 miles outside the adventure-rich town of Jackson Hole, the Curtis Canyon Campground sits high above the adjoining National Elk Refuge and delivers big views of the standout scenery below.

Within the Bridger-Teton National Forest, Curtis Canyon is a non-electric campground operated by the US Forest Service on a first-come, first-served basis. All 12 sites of Curtis Canyon Campground share access to vault toilets and drinking water, and each campsite comes with a fire ring, picnic table, and food-storage box.

Within a short walking distance of each campsite, the Curtis Canyon Overlook is easily accessible. With a little more of a drive to access, the campground isn't as popular as those within park boundaries, but the spaces do fill up. Curtis Canyon Campground is also a little more affordable thanks to it location outside the park

Address: Bridger Teton National Forest, Forest Rd 30443, Jackson, Wyoming

Official site: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/btnf/recarea/?recid=71629

7. Death Canyon Shelf Camping Zone

Death Canyon Shelf Camping Zone
Death Canyon Shelf Camping Zone | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Grand Teton National Park provides an extensive backcountry trail system, including eleven different permitted camping zones in the park's southwest region. Together, these different zones create the rest-stops along the iconic Teton Crest Trail, which exposes some of the best alpine scenery in the American West. All camping zones are only accessible via backpacking and require a sought-after permit.

All permit holders need to pack in every bit of gear they need to these backcountry, zero-amenity camping zones. Hikers also need to be sure to pack everything back out after spending the night. Permits can be obtained online beginning January 8th of the same season.

While all camping zones provide a memorable overnight experience, the Death Canyon Shelf stands above the rest. Situated high on the skyline above Death Canyon, the Death Canyon Shelf Camping Zone allows for 16 groups to disperse camp in the area. Gain the permit to do so, and camping on the Death Canyon Shelf provides unreal elevated views of scenic Death Canyon, as well as unforgettable sunsets on the not-so-distant peak of Grand Teton.

Official site: https://www.nps.gov/grte/planyourvisit/bczones.htm

8. Teton Canyon Campground

View of the Teton Range from Idaho
View of the Teton Range from Idaho

On the outskirts of the western edge of Grand Teton National Park, the Teton Canyon Campground is only be accessible through the small city of Driggs, Idaho. Alongside the partial and inviting views of the Teton Range, there are 20 non-electric sites available, all sharing access to vault toilets and potable water. The campground is best suited for cars and small trailers.

Other common guests at the Teton Canyon Campground include moose, bear, and deer. Each campsite at Teton Canyon comes with a food-storage locker that campers are required to use. The biggest draw here is the quick access to some of the best hiking trails in Grand Teton National Park, including entrance into the Alaskan Basin and the Teton Crest Trail.

Official site: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/ctnf/recarea/?recid=54725

9. Atherton Creek Campground

Atherton Creek Campground
Atherton Creek Campground | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Located forty minutes from the Moose Entrance of Grand Teton, Atherton Creek Campground provides the perfect place to get away from the crowded conditions found closer to the park.

Owned and operated by the US Forest Service, Atherton Creek Campground features 22 non-electric sites that can accommodate trailers up to 26 feet in length. Each campsite comes with a picnic table and fire ring, as well as great views and easy access to the adjacent Lower Slide Lake.

Visitors and overnight users of the Atherton Creek Campground are encouraged to use the public boat dock to put their non-motorized or motorized vessel onto the lake. Other popular activities at the campground include swimming, paddling, and trout fishing. All sites at Atherton Creek are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Address: Forest Road 30374, Kelly, Wyoming

Official site: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/btnf/recarea/?recid=71623

10. Paintbrush Canyon Camping Zones

Paintbrush Canyon Camping Zones
Paintbrush Canyon Camping Zones | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Not far from the shores of Jenny Lake, the Lower and Upper Paintbrush Canyon Camping Zones are in the Teton Range backcountry. These aptly named areas provide nothing short of an idyllic alpine environment, brimming with big scenery and a backdrop of luscious meadows. Permits are required to stay within either camping zone. No amenities are provided, and carrying a backpack to the designated camping areas is not exactly an easy walk in the park.

But the effort is well rewarded within the Paintbrush Canyon Camping Zones, with expanding views of mountain scenery. Camping in the backcountry in Grand Teton means being "bear aware" and having the tools to properly store your food at night.

For those with advanced planning or good timing on a walk-up permit, the Holly Lake Camping Zone, within the Upper Paintbrush Zone, accommodates only three small permitted campsites a night.

Official site: https://www.nps.gov/grte/planyourvisit/bczones.htm

11. Mike Harris Campground

View from Teton Pass
View from Teton Pass

Located on the western slope of Teton Pass, the Mike Harris Campground can be found just across the state border in Idaho. A scenic drive from the Moose Entrance of Grand Teton National Park, the Mike Harris Campground delivers even easier access to the surrounding Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

Best suited for tent camping and car trailers, the 12 non-electric campsites share access to vault toilets and drinking water, and every campsite comes with a picnic table, fire-ring, and food storage box.

Every visitor to Mike Harris also shares access to the scenic Mikesell Canyon multi-use trail, as well as trout fishing in nearby Trail Creek. When it comes time to explore Grand Teton National Park from the Mike Harris Campground, the 22-mile drive over Teton Pass will test your brake pads and deliver an alluring view of what you're about to explore.

All campsites at Mike Harris Campground are available for advance reservation.

Address: Caribou Targhee National Forest, Forest Rd 330, Victor, Idaho

Official site: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/ctnf/recarea/?recid=54317

12. Cascade Canyon Camping Zones

Cascade Canyon Camping Zones
Cascade Canyon Camping Zones | Photo Copyright: Brad Lane

Split between a North and South Fork Camping Zone, Cascade Canyon provides the epitome of Teton Range backcountry. Permits are required to backpack into and stay the night in Cascade Canyon, and all overnight users must pack in all equipment and gear they will need. This includes food, water purification, shelter, and waste disposal.

Big views of the Teton Range and surrounding alpine environment can be found wherever you pitch a tent within the camping zone. It's not uncommon to see a bear, moose, or marmot sharing the area. Ideally, part of a larger itinerary on the Teton Crest Trail, both Cascade Canyon Camp Zones provide the perfect backdrop for a backcountry adventure.

Official site: https://www.nps.gov/grte/planyourvisit/bczones.htm

Where to Stay near Grand Teton National Park for Sightseeing

Almost all overnight options fall into the neighboring adventure-town of Jackson. Whether you are looking for something decadent or dollar-conscious, you can find it here.

  • Luxury Hotels: If elegance is something you crave during your visit to Grand Teton, then somewhere like the five-star Amangani is right for you. Featuring luxury suites, superior service, and surreal views of the Teton Range and Snake River Valley, Amangani specializes in the good life.

    More towards the heart of Jackson, Hotel Jackson is another boutique overnight option featuring a modern design, spa services, and spacious rooms.

    Found at the base of the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, the Hotel Terra Jackson Hole, A Noble House Resort is a premiere lifestyle hotel with infinity pools, rain showers, and ski-slope services.
  • Mid-Range Hotels: For the best value when visiting Grand Teton National Park, the Huff House Inn and Cabins in Jackson features historically restored cabins and cozy confines, as well as a potent mountain charm.

    On the other side of Jackson's Historic Downtown District, the locally-owned and operated Parkway Inn can put you up for the night at an affordable rate and provides modern conveniences with a rustic charm.

    Farther west, in town, the Elk Country Inn is widely known for its well-maintained facilities and proximity to the community-favorite Bubba's BBQ.
  • Budget Hotels: For those looking to save their vacation dollars for all the attractions, the Super 8 Jackson Hole, southwest of Jackson's city center, comes with a very affordable rate without sacrificing cleanliness or comfortable beds.

    Just down the road, the Motel 6 Jackson features remodeled rooms, free parking, and babysitting services.

    Closer to the ski slopes of Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, the 4 Winds caters to adventure seekers, with clean and efficient rooms and a central location for exploring Jackson and the surrounding mountains.

More Related Articles on PlanetWare.com

imageMore Things to Do in Grand Teton National Park: Not far from the best campgrounds in the park, the best hiking trails in Grand Teton beckon for even more adventure. For modern overnight accommodation, our guide to where to stay near Grand Teton highlights the many hotels, lodges, and cabins in the area. More attractions of the region can be explored in Jackson Hole.

imageExploring Yellowstone National Park: The neighboring national park to the north, Yellowstone National Park, encompasses over two million acres of dynamic terrain. With so much space to explore, our guides to the best hiking trails and top campgrounds in Yellowstone can help with the logistics of visiting. For information on all four seasons of the year in Yellowstone, check out our best time to visit Yellowstone National Park article.

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