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8 Top-Rated Tourist Attractions on the Bay of Fundy

The Bay of Fundy, between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia in eastern Canada, is neither the largest nor the deepest in the world. But this Atlantic Ocean bay has the world's highest tides, and at the extreme north end, the difference between low and high tide can measure 19 meters (10 fathoms).

It's the extended, delta-like shape of the bay that intensifies the tides. Over time, the ocean has carved a dramatic coastline that features hidden caves, sea stacks, and sandy beaches. Attractions like hiking trails, scenic viewpoints, and heritage lighthouses await visitors.

1 Hopewell Cape

Hopewell Cape
Hopewell Cape
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On the Bay of Fundy coast, scouring tides have eroded cliffs and left curious sea stacks along the shoreline. Nowhere is the scene more impressive than at Hopewell Cape, where the Hopewell Rocks are a sightseeing draw at both low and high tides.

At low water, visitors walk out on the ocean floor to see the naturally carved shapes and look way up to the high tide mark. Some of the Hopewell Rocks are shaped like animals, arches, or keyholes. At high tide, the columns disappear and only the green tops of the "Flowerpot Rocks" remain visible. Walking trails, an interpretive center, and café cater to large visiting crowds.

Address: 131 Discovery Road, Hopewell Cape

2 St. Martins and the Fundy Trail Parkway

St. Martins and the Fundy Trail Parkway
St. Martins and the Fundy Trail Parkway wallygrom
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The Fundy Trail Parkway offers beautiful coastal views along the Bay of Fundy. This scenic drive starts near the small, shipbuilding town of St. Martins and continues northeast. The paved driving route twists along the shoreline to scenic lookouts over beaches, cliffs, wildlife, and a Flowerpot Rock.

The beauty of the experience is that you can drive the route, or explore further on foot and by bike. There are trails with stairs that lead down to the water's edge. At Big Salmon River, a suspension bridge crosses the waterway and the Big Salmon River Interpretive Centre has exhibits related to the long-gone logging community.

Address: 229 Main St, St. Martins

3 Fundy National Park

Fundy National Park
Fundy National Park
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Fundy National Park is one of the rare undeveloped coastlines on the Bay of Fundy. The spectacular wilderness features tide-carved scenery and coastal hiking trails. Within the park, one of New Brunswick's famous covered bridges spans Point Wolfe River. Bird watchers head to the park in spring and autumn, when migrating species feed on the Bay of Fundy low tide mudflats. Other popular park activities include camping, hiking, swimming in an outdoor pool, beach combing, boating, and golfing.

4 Grand Manan Island

Grand Manan Island
Grand Manan Island
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Grand Manan Island lies at the southwestern entrance to the Bay of Fundy. A small year-round population lives on the island, which is only about 35 kilometers long and up to ten kilometers wide. Whales and other wildlife are plentiful in this area during the summer months, when viewing tours are the main attraction on Grand Manan.

The island marshlands and rocky ridges make it a favorite resting place for numerous species of birds, and Auduboner's have spotted more than 300 different species here. Mineral-hunters are attracted to the northwestern part of the island near Dark Harbour. Shaped by volcanic activity, this end of the island is a trove of semi-precious stones such as amethysts, jasper, and agate.

5 St. Andrews-by-the-Sea

St. Andrews-by-the-Sea
St. Andrews-by-the-Sea Ken McMillan
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In the far south of New Brunswick and close to the border with Maine, the pretty little fishing-port of St. Andrews lies on Passamaquoddy Bay. Its typical New England-type houses have a heritage charm, and local museums like the Ross Memorial Museum (set in an 1820s mansion) introduce the area history. One of the top horticultural displays in Canada, Kingsbrae Garden covers 27 acres with traditional plantings and modern flowerbeds.

Also on the St. Andrews coast, Ministers Island Historic Site is a 50-room summer home that once belonged to visionary railway builder Sir William Van Horne. The Bay of Fundy island is only accessible by causeway at low tide.

6 Editor's Pick Roosevelt Campobello International Park on Campobello Island

Roosevelt Campobello International Park on Campobello Island
Roosevelt Campobello International Park on Campobello Island
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Set on the Canadian island of Campobello and connected to Maine by a bridge, is the spacious country estate of the Roosevelt family. The centerpiece of Roosevelt Campobello International Park is a 34 room "cottage" that was occupied by the soon to be president and his family from 1905 to 1921. Items on display include furnishings, toys, photographs and other Roosevelt family memorabilia.

Campobello Island is a picturesque, but rural spot. Its landmark feature is the East Quoddy Lighthouse, also known as Head Harbour Lighthouse.

Address: 459 Route 774, Welshpool

Official site: http://www.fdr.net/

7 Cape Enrage

Cape Enrage
Cape Enrage
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Though incredibly scenic, the 1838 lighthouse that's perched on the rugged Cape Enrage cliffs looks much like many Atlantic Canadian vistas. But it's the outdoor activity center that's unusual here, offering rappelling, zip-lining, rock-climbing, and other fun pursuits. A local teacher and six students started the operation in 1993, and it has since grown into a popular Bay of Fundy attraction.

Address: 650 Cape Enrage Road, Waterside

Official site: http://www.capeenrage.ca/

8 St. Stephen

St. Stephen
St. Stephen Doug Kerr
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The small industrial town of St. Stephen sits where the little St. Croix River enters the bay. Founded in the 17th century, St. Stephen did not really develop until one hundred years later, when American Loyalists settled here. The bridge over the river leads to Calais, in the U.S. state of Maine.

The town calls itself "Canada's Chocolate Town" and has a chocolate museum where you can learn all about brothers James and Gilbert Ganong, who opened their own grocery store in 1873. When the business almost failed, they added candy and soon started to make their own. A modern chocolate factory now operates in St. Stephen.

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