14 Top-Rated Tourist Attractions in Brussels

Brussels, capital of Belgium, principal seat of the Belgian Royal Family, and capital of the European Union, is a remarkably small, easy-going, and human-sized city for all its importance. Unlike beautiful Bruges and Ghent, with their hordes of tourists, Brussels is Belgium's main economic and educational hub, which gives the city a more workaday feel than other towns. Here, you get a proper feel for Belgian life, especially its fantastic restaurant and café culture. Although Brussels may not have the star attractions of other Belgian towns, the capital has more than enough to keep visitors occupied for a couple of days with a clutch of world-class museums and art galleries, as well as quirkier sights such as the Atomium, and some wonderful remnants of old architecture in the old town quarter. Once you've craned your neck at Gothic and Baroque splendor, don't forget to stock up on Brussels' famous chocolate.

1 Grand Place (Grote Markt)

Grand Place (Grote Markt)
Grand Place (Grote Markt)
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Right in the heart of Brussels Old Town, the city's main plaza (known as Grand Place) is one of the best preserved in Europe. Much of the square's elegant character is due to the unique architecture of its elegant Gildehuizen (guild houses) with their magnificent gables, pilasters, and balustrades, ornately carved stonework, and rich gold decoration. Most were built between 1696 and 1700 in the Baroque style but with some Flemish influences. The history of the Grand Place dates back much earlier though. It was first established in the 11th century and evolved soon after, to become the political and economic center for the city.

The most recognisable building on the square is the Hôtel de Ville (Town Hall), built in 1402 with the intention of upstaging the Stadhuis in the rival city of Bruges. Inside are several magnificent rooms. Among the most impressive are the Maximilian Chamber hung with Brussels tapestries; the large Council Chamber with a superb ceiling by Victor Janssens and tapestries to his designs; the great banqueting hall and the Marriage Chamber, both beautifully panelled; and the Escalier d'Honneur with murals illustrating the history of Brussels.

Address: Grand Place, Central Brussels

Accomodation: Where to Stay in Brussels - TripAdvisor.com

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2 Mannekin Pis

Mannekin Pis
Mannekin Pis
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Along the Rue de l'Etuve is Brussels' best-known landmark, the Manneken Pis, usually besieged by a throng of tourists. Although he can be traced back to at least 1388, nothing much is known about the origin of the figure of a little boy urinating, popularly referred to as "the oldest citizen of Brussels." The Manneken is, however, surrounded by various legends. According to one, the fountain is a memorial to a courageous infant who averted a conflagration, according to another, it commemorates the son of a count who succumbed to a pressing urge while taking part in a procession. The present statue was made in 1619 by Jérôme Duquesnoy the Elder and has been stolen on several occasions though always recovered. During major celebrations, events, and festivals in Brussels, the statue is famed for being dressed in costume.

Address: Rue de l'Etuve, Central Brussels

3 Saint-Michel Cathedral (Sint-Michiels Kathedraal)

Saint-Michel Cathedral (Sint-Michiels Kathedraal)
Saint-Michel Cathedral (Sint-Michiels Kathedraal)
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Dedicated to St. Michael and St. Gudula (the patron saints of Brussels) this Gothic church was first founded in 1225 but only completed in the 15th century. The facade is impressive, rising majestically above a broad flight of steps and crowned with twin 69-meter-high towers designed by Jan van Ruysbroeck. The beautifully proportioned interior (108 meters by 50 meters) is lavishly furnished and is home to some outstanding stained glass windows created by Bernard van Orley. Head to the transepts to see the finest examples depicting Charles V and Isabella of Portugal (south transept) and the Hungarian royal pair Louis II and Mary (north transept), and then into the Chapel of the Holy Sacrament, to the left of the choir, where the window illustrates the story of the Miracle of the Host.

Address: Parvis Street Gudule, Central Brussels

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4 Belgian Comic Strip Center

Belgian Comic Strip Center
Belgian Comic Strip Center Katherine
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This gorgeous 1906 building, designed by Victor Horta, is home to the wonderful Comic Strip Center, devoted to the history of cartoons and comic strips in the country that gave the world The Smurfs and Tintin. A constantly rotating exhibition of 200 original comic strip drawings by Belgian and French comic artists is shown here. In addition, the museum documents the rise in popularity of Belgian and French comic strips through a cleverly curated collection of original manuscripts, draft sketches, and imaginatively reconstructed sets including Lucky Luke's saloon and Tim, Struppi, and Captain Haddock's moon rocket.

Address: Maison Waucquez, 20 Rue des Sables, Central Brussels

Official site: www.comicscenter.net

5 Place Royale (Koningsplein)

Place Royale (Koningsplein)
Place Royale (Koningsplein)
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The most important building on this square is the Royal Palace (Palais Royal) used by the Belgian royal family as an official residence. The Belgian flag, flown from the roof, signals the sovereign's presence and a ceremonial Changing of the Guard takes place every day at about 2.30pm. Surrounding the palace are an ensemble of cultural buildings boasting neoclassical facades. The Palais des Académies, home of the Royal Academy of Sciences and once the residence of the Crown Prince of Orange, and the Palais des Beaux-Arts (Paleis voor Schone Kunste) on the west side of the plaza, designed and built in the 1920s by Victor Horta, are two of the finest examples.

Address: Place des Palais, Central Brussels

6 Belgian Royal Museum of Fine Arts

Belgian Royal Museum of Fine Arts
Belgian Royal Museum of Fine Arts elPadawan
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Belgium's Royal Museum of Fine Arts (1875-81) is one of the largest and best art galleries in the world. The museum grew out of a collection first set up in 1797 and was originally housed in the former palace of Charles of Lorraine. This was transferred to the newly established Musées Royaux in 1846. The collection is divided into two parts: the Musée d'art ancien (Museum of Ancient Art) with a famous collection of Flemish and Dutch Old Masters including works by Petrus Christus (Pietà), Rogier van der Weyden (The Mourning of Christ), Dirk Bouts (Judgment of the Emperor Otto), Hans Memling, and a fine Adoration of the Magi by Gerard David; and the Musée d'art moderne (Museum of Modern Art), which has a range of mainly 19th- and 20th-century Belgian works.

Address: Rue du Musée 9, Central Brussels

Official site: www.fine-arts-museum.be

7 Atomium

Atomium
Atomium wing1990hk
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Along with Manneken Pis, the Atomium is Brussels' best-known landmark, and although it's a bit of a journey by tram to get out here, the bizarre 102-meter-high steel and aluminium structure, designed by the architect André Waterkeyn for the 1958 Brussels World Exhibition, is the city's most surreal sight. The building represents a molecule of iron magnified 165 million times, and visitors may enter the interior where four of the nine spheres are now used for the presentation of a show about human life called Biogenium.

Address: Eeuwfeestlaan 20, Boulevard du Centenaire

Official site: http://atomium.be/

8 Northern City Center

St Catherine's Church
St Catherine's Church
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The majestically proportioned Church of Sainte-Catherine was built in 1850 in a blend of Romanesque, Gothic, and Renaissance styles to replace an earlier building. Of particular interest in the interior are the 14th- or 15th-century figure of a black Madonna and a painting by de Crayer. The 11th- to 12th-century Tour Noire, which stands behind the church, is a remnant of the old city wall, while on the west side, the delightful fish market is a reminder that this was once one of the old town quays. Even when seen at a distance from the fish market, the magnificent facade of Saint-Jean-Baptiste au Béguinage Cathedral is an impressive sight. The church, all that remains of a Béguine convent founded in the 13th century, was built between 1657 and 1676. Designed by Luc Fayd'herbe it is one of the finest Flemish-Italian Baroque churches in Belgium. Among the items of note in the light and spacious interior are the beautiful pulpit and the many paintings, including seven by the Brussels artist Van Loon.

Address: Rue du Peuplier, Central Brussels

9 Mont des Arts

Mont des Arts
Mont des Arts
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The Mont des Arts was created between 1956 and 1958, occupying the elevated site between the Place Royale and the Place de l'Albertine. The architecturally imposing complex of large buildings includes the Bibliothèque Albert I and the strikingly modern Palais de la Dynastie and Palais de Congrès. From the square between them is a fine view of the lower central city. The Bibliothèque Albert I was founded during the period of Burgundian rule and comprises more than three million volumes together with a valuable collection of manuscripts and several interesting museums.

Address: Boulevard de l' Empereur, Central Brussels

10 Notre-Dame du Sablon

Notre-Dame du Sablon
Notre-Dame du Sablon
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The 15th- to 16th-century church of Notre-Dame du Sablon (Onze Lieve Vrouw op de Zavel), generally considered one of the loveliest Late Gothic churches in Belgium, was built as a replacement for a small chapel first erected on the sandy expanse of the Sablon by the Crossbowmen's Guild in 1304. The interior of the church is breathtaking, in particular because of its marvellous stained glass. Also of interest is the burial chapel of the Thurn und Taxis family, partly the work of Luc Fayd'herbe. Kept in the sacrarium is a figure of the Virgin, a copy, so legend has it, of a Madonna brought to the chapel in 1348 by a woman from Antwerp, Baet Soetens, to whom the Virgin had appeared.

Address: Rue de la Regence, Central Brussels

11 Parc du Cinquantenaire

Parc du Cinquantenaire
Parc du Cinquantenaire
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The Parc du Cinquantenaire was established in 1880 to commemorate the country's 50th anniversary. Its centerpiece is the monumental Palais du Cinquantenaire, the two wings of which, linked in 1905 by a massive triumphal arch designed by the French architect Charles Girault, house two of Brussels' most interesting museums. The Royal Art and History Museum is home to one of the most extensive tapestry collections in the world, and the Belgian Army Museum and Museum of Military History (Koninklijk Museum van het Leger en van de Militaire Geschiedenis) provides an overview of the development of military technology and of the major campaigns fought on Belgian soil.

Address: Avenue de la Renaissance, Central Brussels

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12 Château Royal

Château Royal
Château Royal Stephane Mignon
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Although the Château Royal, home of the Belgian Royal Family, is not itself open to the public, the park surrounding it at Laeken is. There are delightful footpaths and a number of attractions worth seeing, such as the monument to Leopold I at the center of the circular flowerbed in front of the palace. The Japanese Tower, in the northernmost corner of the park, was originally built for the Paris Exhibition of 1900. The hothouses, erected in Leopold II's time, are the highlight of the gardens and are open to the public during April and May when many of the plants are in flower.

Address: Avenue de Madrid, Laeken, Brussels

13 Basilique Nationale du Sacré Coeur

Basilique Nationale du Sacré Coeur
Basilique Nationale du Sacré Coeur
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The Koekelberg district is dominated by the massive Basilique Nationale du Sacré Coeur (Nationale Basiliek van het Heilig Hart), the fifth largest church in the world and brainchild of Leopold II, begun in 1905 to mark the country's 75th anniversary. The building was only completed in 1970. Not surprisingly, it displays something of a mixture of styles, impressing nevertheless by its sheer size (141 meters by 107 meters). Inside is an excellent collection of art and an ongoing exhibition on the history of the basilica. The picture of Christ giving his blessing, which hangs above the altar, is by Georges Minne. From the cupola is a breathtaking view of the city and across the countryside to Antwerp. Binoculars can be rented on-site.

Address: Parvis de la Basilique 1, Koekelberg, Brussels

14 Abbaye de la Cambre

Abbaye de la Cambre
Abbaye de la Cambre
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In 1200, Cistercian nuns founded an abbey here, which was later destroyed in the 16th century but then rebuilt. Now, set in lovely French gardens, the abbey houses the National Geographical Institute and an art college. The former 14th-century abbey church is a slender, elegant building with Baroque vaulting. Inside is a painting by Albert Bouts (The Mocking of Christ) and the shrine of St. Boniface, a 13th-century Bishop of Brussels. The windows of the cloister are decorated with the arms of more than 40 abbesses and nuns.

Address: Rue du Monastere, Saint Gilles, Brussels

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