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Maseru to the Maletsunyane Falls

Thaba Bosiu, South Africa

To the east of Maseru a track branches off A 2 for the historic settlement of Thaba Bosiu (''Mountain of Night''), originally a small fort established by Moshoeshoe I in 1824, which for many years was capital of the country.
From the hill on which there are remains of the original settlement there are fine views of the Berea plateau and Mt Qiloane.

Roma, South Africa

The university town of Roma was founded by Moshoeshoe in 1862, and some years later a Roman Catholic mission station was established here, which in 1945 became a college and later still a university.
The road, at first still asphalted, continues southeast (from here to Semonkong it is 83km/52mi), but soon (beyond Ngope) degenerates into an unsurfaced track, running through very beautiful scenery, with villages, fields of maize, herds of cattle and flocks of sheep. In March the country is gay with the blossom of cosmeas and wild peach-trees.
Here too (for example at the village of Ha Mpotu) there are caves containing Bushman paintings. The great expanses of reeds in this area have given the principal river, the Malehlakana, its name (''Mother of Reeds'').

Mapeshoane, South Africa

The village of Mapeshoane is near the Helekokoane Cave with Bushman paintings. East is the Raboshabane Gorge, the Mohomeng Cave and the Raboshabane Crag 200m/660ft). The nearby village of Motlepu is the starting-point for the ascent of the impressive peak of Thaba Telle (2533m/8311ft). A road then runs down to cross the Makhalaneng (''Place of the Small Shrimps'') River and then climbs again to Nkesi's Pass (2012m/6601ft), from which there is a superb view of Thaba Putsoa (3096m/10,158ft) and the neighboring mountains.
Beyond the village of Ramabanta there is a magnificent stretch of road with spectacular views of the surrounding mountains in their varying shades of color.

Maletsunyane Falls

Near Semonkong (''Place of Smoke'') are the Maletsunyane Falls, the highest in southern Africa (192m/630ft). They are a fantastic sight in winter when the water freezes.
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