Historic District, Charleston

The best starting point for a walk through old Charleston is the intersection of Meeting and Market Streets, in the heart of the town. Here is the main building of the City Market (1841), now housing the Confederate Museum. Beyond this are the market halls, bustling with life and colour. Further down Meeting Street is Cumberland Street, with the Powder Magazine (1713). Beyond it, in Church Street, can be seen the tower of St Philip's Church (1835-8; Protestant), occupying the site of the first church founded in 1670. Back on Meeting Street is the circular Congregational Church (1891; originally founded 1681), the meeting house that gave its name to the street. At 135 Meeting Street is the Gibbes Museum of Art, with a very fine collection of paintings and graphic art, including old views of Charleston. At No. 134 is the house in which the secession of South Carolina was signed on December 20th 1860.

Four Corners of Law

The intersection with Broad Street is known as the Four Corners of Law. On the north-east corner is Old City Hall (1801), originally built as a bank; it now houses a collection of pictures, including John Trumbull's fine portrait of Washington. At the north-west corner is the County Court House (1752), originally State House.
At the south-west corner is the Federal Court, built in 1886 on the site of the old Town Guardhouse; and at the south-east corner is St Michael's Church (1752-61; Protestant), which has the town's finest church tower.

Old Exchange

At the south-west corner is the Federal Court, built in 1886 on the site of the old Town Guardhouse; and at the south-east corner is St Michael's Church (1752-61; Protestant), which has the town's finest church tower.
The Exchange was built in 1771 by the British and became the social, political and economic hub of the bustling 18th century port of Charleston.
Official site: www.oldexchange.com
Address: 122 East Bay Street, Charleston, SC 29401-2103, United States

Heyward-Washington House

The Heyward-Washington House in Charleston was built in 1772. It was the home of Thomas Heyward, Jr., signer of the Declaration of Independence. The formal garden is made up of plants found in the area in the 18th century. The home is furnished with Charleston-made furniture.
Address: 87 Church Street, Charleston, SC 29401-2503, United States

Nathaniel Russell House

The Charleston townhouse of Nathaniel and Sarah Russell was completed in 1808. Exhibits present life as it was for the Russell's and their African-American slaves.
Address: 51 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29401-2536, United States

Edmondston-Alston House

The Edmondston-Alston House in Charleston was built in 1825 and has a magnificent view of Charleston Harbor. Alston family furniture, silver, books and paintings are still found throughout the house.
Address: 21 East Battery Street, Charleston, SC 29401-2740, United States

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